where he had graduated first

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where he had graduated first

15 paź 2019, o 03:20

DORAL, Fla. -- The new Doral in raging wind looked a lot like an old U.S. Open on Friday. Matt Kuchar played out of the rough to tap-in range for birdie on the 18th hole for a 2-over 74 that allowed him to join an exclusive group at the Cadillac Championship -- one of only four survivors to par. The Blue Monster gobbled up just about everyone else. Dustin Johnson bogeyed three of his last six holes for a 74. Patrick Reed made only two birdies in his round of 75. Hunter Mahan atoned for a triple bogey with a 4-iron into 5 feet for eagle on the eighth hole, giving him a 74. They joined Kuchar atop the leaderboard at 1-under 143. "I felt stressed all day, because I knew every shot had big penalty written all over it," Mahan said. "It was a really tough day. There wasnt an easy shot out there. One of those rounds where it could go south pretty fast, so youve got to grind it out and find a way to get a number up there and get to the weekend." Only three players broke par in the second round. No one shot in the 60s. The average score was a fraction under 76. "I dont think Ive played in conditions this difficult in the U.S.," Graeme McDowell of Northern Ireland said after a 71 that left him one shot behind. "Its an Open Championship day. Its a real Friday afternoon at St. Andrews in 2010 before they called it. It was hard out there -- really, really hard." Rory McIlroy (74), Francesco Molinari (75) and Jamie Donaldson of Wales (70) also were one behind at even-par 144. Tiger Woods hit three balls in the water and scraped out a 73, thanks in part to a 90-foot birdie putt on the par-3 fourth hole. Phil Mickelson made back-to-back double bogeys, and then laid on his back along the bank of the fourth tee during a long wait. He got up, hit into the water and made another double bogey. Lefty shot 75. Both were still in the mix, only six shots behind. "Its a tough golf course as it is," Reed said. "And with how hard the wind is blowing, it made it even tougher. Almost felt like we were playing at a major today." At times, it looked even worse. Fist pumps were replaced by players stretching out their arm to take a penalty drop from the water -- 113 balls in the water, which is everywhere on the course that Gil Hanse redesigned under the direction of new owner Donald Trump. Trump described it as bold. It turned out to be brutal. And just like a U.S. Open, there were plenty of complaints. The greens were always going to be firm because the course was built in under a year. There was always going to be concern about the sharp edges of fairways and greens that sent balls down the bank and into the water. Throw in gusts that topped 30 mph, and any score was possible on any hole. "The setup is horrendous," Webb Simpson said after a 78 that included a bunker shot that went onto and over the seventh green and into the water. "Even if we had a 10 mph wind, it still would have been bad. I played terrible. I want to get that out there. But when you have conditions like this, and a setup like this, so much luck comes into play." Henrik Stenson prefaced his comments by saying, "How do you say something you might regret the rest of your life?" So he didnt. Stenson, part of the Nos. 1-2-3 grouping from the world ranking, had a 76 and joined Woods at 5-over 149. Masters champion Adam Scott, the other member of that illustrious trio, had a 73 and was at 4-over 148. The group was a combined 14-over par for the tournament. Stenson was walking off the 15th green Friday morning while finishing up the rain-delayed first round. Spotting a small group of reporters, he said, "Are you having fun watching?" And then as he walked away, he smiled and said, "Because its sure as hell not any fun to be playing." Johnson managed for the longest time. Even as everyone was succumbing to par, he was at 3 under with a birdie on No. 12. But he dropped a shot on the par-3 13th. His short iron into the 15th hit the green and rolled over the back and into the water. And on the 18th, his fairway bunker shot came out too strong and over the green, and he missed a 6-foot par putt that would have given him the outright lead. The forecast is for less wind on the weekend, and surely a sigh of relief from the players. And this World Golf Championship is wide open. "Weve all got a shot at it now," Woods said. "No one is going anywhere." Woods, like so many other players, could have gone south. He was 7 over for the round after a wedge tumbled into the water on No. 3. But he made the long birdie on No. 4 and hit wedge to 3 feet for birdie on the next hole, and then managed to avoid bogeys the rest of the way. Graham DeLaet of Weyburn, Sask., finished the day in a tie for 34th place. McIlroy went out in 40, but he made three birdies on the back nine. A 74 was enough to move up the leaderboard on this day. "It was a day where you obviously couldnt win the golf tournament, but you could let it get away from you, and you could rack up a few big numbers and play yourself out of contention," McIlroy said. Luke Donald did just that with an 82. So did Victor Dubuisson, who had an 81. Adidas Lite Racer Trainers Ladies . The post-season, Pierce said repeatedly, is no time to panic. And the Heat, apparently, are nothing to fear. Adidas Nmd Cheap Uk Sale . It was just business as usual for the Thunder at home. Durant scored 32 points and the Thunder beat the Bulls 107-95 on Thursday night for their eighth straight win. http://www.nmdukonlinestore.com/nmd-chu ... deals.html .com) - Ryan Miller made 28 saves to record his fifth shutout of the season and second in as many nights as the Vancouver Canucks defeated the Carolina Hurricanes 3-0 on Friday. Latest Nmd Trainers . Chris Johnson singled with two outs off left-hander Jerry Blevins (1-1), and Schafer pinch ran. With a 2-2 count, Schafer ran on the pitch and Upton dropped a single in front of Bryce Harper. Schafer already was rounding third when Schafer bobbled the ball. Adidas Ultra Boost Outlet Uk . Nix is a career .218 hitter in 425 games over six seasons. The 31-year-old right-handed hitter batted .270 with a homer this spring for Tampa Bay.PHILADELPHIA -- Lewis Katz, a self-made man who built his fortune in New York parking lots, billboards and cable TV, and went on to buy the NBAs New Jersey Nets, NHLs New Jersey Devils and The Philadelphia Inquirer, died in a weekend plane crash. He was 72. Katz died Saturday night in a Massachusetts crash that claimed six other lives. His death was confirmed Sunday by his son, Drew, and his business partner Harold H.F. "Gerry" Lenfest. Katz grew up in working-class Camden, New Jersey, and worked as a lawyer before earning hundreds of millions of dollars investing in the Kinney Parking empire and the Yankees Entertainment and Sports Network in New York. He went on to become a major philanthropist in the Philadelphia region. "Youve got to make money in the world that we live in, in order to accomplish what your ultimate goal is. But along with making money, equally important is preserving, for the community, a community trust," Katz testified at an April hearing on the Inquirers sale. "Thats what this paper represents." Tributes poured in from prominent figures in sports, media, politics, business and education, reflecting the wide range of his interests and charitable endeavours. NBA Commissioner Adam Silver called him "a visionary"; the Yankees held a moment of silence before Sundays game. Temple University recalled his recent advice to graduates to "have as much fun as you can conjure up." "He was a visionary businessman who touched the lives of so many with his tireless pursuit of innovation and enterprise, as well as his deep commitment to his family, friends and community," Silver said in a statement. NHL Commissioner Gary Bettman in a statement called Katz a man of "tremendous influence" and sent condolences to Katzs family and "the many organizations that benefited from his philanthropy." Katz, in his April testimony, said he had lost money on both the Nets and Devils, but made it big through the 2012 sale of the sports cable network. "We lost our shirt in the Devils and the Nets," he testified. "But for the YES network, Id be back in my law office in Cherry Hill, waiting for the clients to come in again." He hoped to be a hands-off owner of the Inquirer, where his longtime companion, Nancy Phillips, was the city editor. "Im spending, hopefully, a lot more time with my grandchildren and Ive opened a school in Camden for approximately 300 children," he testified. "Im not active in business, anymore." Katz had agreed to invest $16 million for a 26 per cent stake in the Inquirer and Philadelphiia Daily News in 2012 at the behest of former Pennsylvania Gov.ddddddddddddEd Rendell, who wanted to return the newspapers to local ownership after a bankruptcy that left them in the hands of New York hedge funds. But a feud with rival investor George Norcross, an equally powerful business leader, over the direction of the news business forced him to be more a more active owner. Katz filed suit last year to stop Norcross from firing Pulitzer Prize-winning editor Bill Marimow. He succeeded, then joined Lenfest in bidding $88 million to buy out Norcross and his allies at an auction Tuesday. "He was very creative, as a person and as a business partner," Lenfest said. "He thought beyond the edge. He had wonderful, creative ideas." The sale had been set to close June 12, but will now be delayed for 30 days to give Katzs family time to get the estate in order, Lenfest said. "Well lose his expertise, but the paper will continue because we both intended to put a new CEO in charge of the day-to-day operations," Lenfest said. Drew Katz will take his fathers seat on the board of directors, Lenfest said. "My father was my best friend. He taught me everything," Drew Katz, who was often seen at his fathers side at business events, said in a statement on behalf of him and his sister. "He never forgot where and how he grew up, and he worked tirelessly to support his community in countless ways that were seen and unseen." Katz had recently given $25 million to Temple University for its medical school, and had previously given $15 million to another alma mater, Dickinson Law School, where he had graduated first in his class. He also supported the Boys & Girls Clubs in Camden, along with many Jewish charities. Katz recently helped fund a charter school in impoverished Camden. "There are so many organizations that he endowed, many anonymously," Marimow said Sunday. Marimow described Katz as a brilliant man and generous philanthropist who developed a love for journalism from a college stint working for the syndicated columnist Drew Pearson. "That really inspired an appreciation and a love for journalism that lasted his whole life," Marimow said. His wife, Marjorie, died in December. His survivors include his son, daughter Melissa, and several grandchildren. Katz, a classmate of Bill Cosby in Temples 1963 graduating class, had spoken at the schools commencement last month, and received an honorary doctorate. "Life in my view is meant to be enjoyed," he told the graduates. "Its meant to have as much fun as you can conjure up" ' ' '

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